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20130201
20130201
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
level that he had been waterboarded. he had practiced at the pentagon. he had been working on this. but when he referred to containment on iran rather than prevention of nuclear weapons and had to be corrected and then corrected again, a note was passed to him, and then the chairman helpfully said to him, containment is not a policy at all. that is not our policy. that is such a critical mistake on an issue that he knew that he was going to be asked about. we knew that he was going to have to explain the, quote, jewish lobby and take that back and some of the other things. the way he did it didn't seem crisp. and then when ted cruz wheeled in the tv screen to play an al jazeera talk show and put him on the spot or how he defended israel or didn't defend israel in response to a question on a talk show, it would be like somebody saying to you or mika, joe, you were on c-span ten years ago, and what did you say to someone who called in? that was very, very tough. >> that was sort of my point at the top. >> it's interesting that you had said, mika, yesterday as we were going to a meeti
pentagon officials are looking at a big change in how they fight tearer. bob orr is in washington. >> those attacks are part of the broader campaign by foreign cyber spies to hack computer systems inside the u.s. officials warn more are inevitable as cyber attacks are ga greater now. to government sponsored hackers inside china. chinese officials denied the allegations calling them not professional and groundless but both papers say there is evidence hackers stole reporters' passwords and attempted to monitor governments of the papers. state-sponsored spies, mostly from china, every day infiltrate a broad spectrum of government and business networks insight the u.s. >> cyber terrorism presents one of the biggest threats. >> secretary of defense nominee chuck hagel warned the attacks could be crippling. >> it's an insidious quiet kind of a threat that we've never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. >> for now the damage is economic. cyber spies and criminal hackers are stealing corporate secrets worth an estimated $250 billion a year from u.s. businesses but they worry m
reasons, the pentagon and the planners have made their own case to the president. and with the new resource problem we confronted in mali, look what it took to support french against al qaeda sub contractors. if we can't do that when in fact americans are held hostage and killed, what kind of response do you really expect for . >> is that a consequence of the u.s. not getting involved in mali earlier? >> what is the implication from that we in effect need to be involved -- . >> the u.s. has been concerned about mali for at least eight nows. -- months only now there's a discussion about where we should do more. >> look, in the time of the great extra cater. we are -- that -- what is threaten, our foreign policy is not manic interventionism right now. that's not what we have to worry about here. >> let's move on. if you have a question, raise your hand. i'm going ask you to identify yourself. keep your question short. let's go to [inaudible] of radio-- and then go to the woman right here in the black and hand the microphone to her. >> hi, my name is -- [inaudible] that syria is part
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)